Judith Heard, a Ugandan top model, socialite and influencer, is a constant victim of online body shaming, something she believes “can and must stop.”

Body shaming is the action or practice of humiliating someone by making mocking or critical comments about their body shape or size.

Do you make comments like “no wonder she’s so big eating at a place like that” as you pass the line at chicken tv (in Wandegz)? It’s all subtle – and sometimes not – but it is so harmful. It is body shaming and we can and must stop.

Judith Heard

Judith Heard, among several other top Ugandan celebrities, has faced heavy online criticism with most of the critics taking it to her body size.

As a stylish mother, fashionista, and a top model, Judith Heard will wear whatever she wants and still pull off the look.

Read Also: “I eat a lot but I wonder why I don’t gain weight” – Judith Heard

A few online dwellers, however, have made a meal of always picking up a biased judgement in relation to her skimpy outfits and hurling insults in her direction.

On Monday, in a post on our Facebook page, we shared a photo of Judith Heard dressed in a relatively skimpy outfit, looking elegant as usual.

The comment section was immediately bombarded by mostly women whose comments were directed towards her body weight and legs.

Upon reading through the comments, Judith Heard shared screenshots on her page and in the caption, she spoke against the body shaming.

The mother of three revealed how she has constantly been a victim of body shaming but she believes it is something that “can and must stop.”

“This is how some people choose to start their week off by making another human being feel so sick most sad part is that most of these people are women. It’s about time women found something better to do to each than breaking each other down.” Judith began her rant.

She adds, “Stop body shaming. We’ve all heard the phrase “everyone’s different” from a young age. We’ve probably accepted this for almost every area of our lives. We have friends who are hilarious, others serious, some close to genius and others aloof. We see success in all different forms and associate with people from various religions. Most of us have never thought to assess the value of these differences, they just are what they are, and we appreciate the richness they add to our lives.”

“What about when it comes to weight and appearance? Most of us also have friends and family of all different sizes. But do we have the same acceptance of this? Or do you find yourself at times critiquing other people’s bodies? “Gosh Nalumasii has gained some weight hasn’t she?” Or do you find yourself discussing how others should try this diet, eat different types of food, exercise more or in a different way? Do you ever nudge your friend to point out a body shape that you find amusing or something to pity? Do you feel sorry for “that poor man” because you assume they could not be happy within a body of that size? Do you make comments like “no wonder she’s so big eating at a place like that” as you pass the line at chicken tv (in Wandegz)? It’s all subtle – and sometimes not – but it is so harmful. It is body shaming and we can and must stop.

“Body shaming isn’t only directed toward others, we often do it even more ferociously to ourselves. Dieting for that upcoming wedding, commenting that you need to “get back on track” after “letting go lately”, criticising our various body parts, wishing them to be different, refusing them to be seen or touched, sometimes even by those that are closest to us. Again, it’s subtle, but it is so harmful. It is body shaming and we can and must stop. #stopbodyshaming”

We condemn all forms of body shaming and we hope Judith Heard’s message can bring about that desired change.

Josh Ruby is an Editor with high interest and knowledge in the Ugandan entertainment space, an industry he has been actively part of since 2010. Leads to breaking stories are welcome!

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